No. 31 - March 2005

Welcome to the Recipes4us.co.uk free monthly newsletter.  If you have any suggestions for additions to this newsletter,

or if you wish to submit a culinary related article,  please write to me at Newsletter@Recipes4us.co.uk . 

 

Happy Cooking ! 

 

 

Florence Sandeman, Editor

 

Food Funny

What did the hungry computer eat? 

Chips....... one byte at a time

 

 

 

What's New This Month

 

Cooking by Country

 

BULGARIA

Click the picture to find out about Bulgaria's culinary culture and history, present day cooking and customs plus lots of recipe

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Ingredient Analysis

 

CORN

Click the picture to find out about Bulgaria's culinary culture and history, present day cooking and customs plus lots of recipe

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Cooking Tip of the Month

To soften hardened brown sugar in the microwave

 

Place hardened brown sugar in a microwave safe bowl, cover with two wet paper towels. Tightly cover bowl with plastic wrap, pierce in 2 places then microwave on 100% power for 1 1/2 to 2 minutes (microwave ovens vary in power so you may need to adjust the heating time.) 

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What's in Season

Rhubarb, beetroot, broccoli, carrots, leeks, mint, parsley, purple sprouting broccoli

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EDITORIAL TITLE AND INTRO IF ANY

Firstly, don't feel you have to grow hundreds of different veggies. If you've never done it before, just pick 2 or 3 of your favourites and start from there. The good old Tomato is certainly worth a try. Why pay extra at the supermarket for "vine" tomatoes. Half the time they don't taste much better than ordinary loose ones. Don't be fooled by that "fresh vine" smell either. It's not always an indication that the texture or taste will be any better....it's just the smell of the stalk. 

 

Certain dwarf varieties have the added advantage of being able to grow in hanging baskets amongst the lobelia or in growbags or pots. 

 

Ah...POTS...my speciality. I have grown all sorts of things in pots and growbags over the years. Dwarf green beans, courgettes (with the bonus that you get the flowers which you can stuff - very trendy) carrots, lettuce, Aubergines, Capsicums, Chilies, rocket, potatoes YES potatoes, spinach, baby beetroot, spring onions,  plus a whole range of herbs such as rosemary, parsley, basil, bay, coriander, thyme, sage and oregano.

 

Pots sizes can start from 4" in diameter for many  herbs to 6" in diameter and depth for small catches of baby carrots, dwarf green beans, radish and cut-and- come-again lettuce,  to 8-10" in diameter for larger crops like leaf beet which is an excellent substitute for spinach and has the advantage that you cut a few of the outer leaves from the plants at a time so the hearts keep growing for later harvesting ensuring a continuous crop of succulent young leaves.

Firstly, don't feel you have to grow hundreds of different veggies. If you've never done it before, just pick 2 or 3 of your favourites and start from there. The good old Tomato is certainly worth a try. Why pay extra at the supermarket for "vine" tomatoes. Half the time they don't taste much better than ordinary loose ones. Don't be fooled by that "fresh vine" smell either. It's not always an indication that the texture or taste will be any better....it's just the smell of the stalk. 

 

Certain dwarf varieties have the added advantage of being able to grow in hanging baskets amongst the lobelia or in growbags or pots. 

 

Ah...POTS...my speciality. I have grown all sorts of things in pots and growbags over the years. Dwarf green beans, courgettes (with the bonus that you get the flowers which you can stuff - very trendy) carrots, lettuce, Aubergines, Capsicums, Chilies, rocket, potatoes YES potatoes, spinach, baby beetroot, spring onions,  plus a whole range of herbs such as rosemary, parsley, basil, bay, coriander, thyme, sage and oregano.

 

Pots sizes can start from 4" in diameter for many  herbs to 6" in diameter and depth for small catches of baby carrots, dwarf green beans, radish and cut-and- come-again lettuce,  to 8-10" in diameter for larger crops like leaf beet which is an excellent substitute for spinach and has the advantage that you cut a few of the outer leaves from the plants at a time so the hearts keep growing for later harvesting ensuring a continuous crop of succulent young leaves.

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The Kitchen Garden

! ! !    STOP PRESS    ! ! !

 

Don't forget St. Patrick's Day on 17th March. We have a section dedicated to the Patron Saint of Ireland with some background information about him plus, of course, LOTS of recipes - click the hat

Recipe of the Month

 

Mustard Rhubarb Salsa

Did you know that rhubarb was originally classified as a vegetable? Well it's true  and it was only re-classified as a fruit in the 40's.  With early rhubarb coming into season now, I thought I'd get away from the usual rhubarb crumble or stewed rhubarb and give you a more unusual recipe. It's very quick & simple but gives a wonderful edge to grilled fish.

Ingredients
1 tsp Olive Oil
225g/8oz Rhubarb
2 tbsp Sugar
1-1/2 tbsp Dijon Mustard
1/2 Red onion, chopped
1/4 tsp Lime Juice
1 tbsp freshly chopped Parsley
1 teasp freshly chopped Basil
Salt and Black Pepper

Serves 4    

Cooking and Prep time:    15 minutes

 

Instructions

1. Chop the rhubarb into 2.5cm/1-inch pieces.

 

2. Heat the oil in a wide saucepan over medium heat then add the  rhubarb and sugar and cook, stirring often, for about 5 minutes or until the rhubarb is soft.

 

3.  Remove from heat and stir in remaining ingredients.

 

New and featured Recipes 

V = Vegetarian       GF = Gluten Free      DF = Dairy Free

 

 

 

 

 

 

Whether you're looking for everyday,  exotic or unusual food and drink,  visit

  UKFoodOnline.co.uk. 

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